(707) 477-3862

Sewage leak

Read the Report Here

PRELIMINARY REPORT REGARDING
SEWAGE OVERFLOW ON DECEMBER 19, 2010

SEWAGE SYSTEM OPERATOR: NORTH TAHOE PUBLIC UTILITY
DISTRICT
RESPONSIBLE PUMP STATION: DOLLAR HILL
LOCATION: PLACER COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

SUBMITTED TO:      JONATHAN BASS, ESQ.
COBLENTZ PATCH DUFFY & BASS, LLP
ONE FERRY BUILDING, SUITE 200
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111-4213

PERTAINING TO:    STUART CORVIN
VS
NORTH TAHOE PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT
CASE NO. TCV0001801
SUPERIOR COURT, COUNTY OF PLACER
DATE 08-28-2013

PREPARED BY:      JOSEPH PERRY, P.E.
JOSEPH PERRY P.E., LLC
PO BOX 141
PENNGROVE, CA 94951

Table of Contents
1. Introduction —————————————————– Page 1
2. Scope of Investigation —————————————————– Page 2
3. References —————————————————– Page 3
4. Review of Data —————————————————– Page 4-7
5. Discussion —————————————————– Page 7-10
6. Conclusions —————————————————– Page 10-15
7. Curriculum Vitae —————————————————– Page 14-17

Introduction:

Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering Company had an ongoing contract for Engineering
with North Tahoe Public Utility District. Stantec Consulting Inc., offered to North Tahoe Public
Utility District to prepare “amendment number 2 for Pump and Motor Replacement Design/Master
Plan Preliminary Work” which included Electrical Engineering Services for the Dollar Hill Pump
Station Standby Power Electrical System. Stantec Consulting Inc., informed North Tahoe Public
Utility District that they would be using Dinter Engineering Co., the Electrical Engineering
Company as a subcontractor to perform the electrical engineering for this project; it was further
noted in Exhibit “A” to the North Tahoe Public Utility District that “Dinter Engineering Co., and
Stantec Consulting Inc., have worked together on many projects for over forty years.”

On April 24th, 2009 the North Tahoe Public Utility District entered into an Engineering Contract with
Stantec Consulting Inc., to prepare “amendment number 2 for Pump and Motor Replacement
Design/Master Plan Preliminary Work” which included Electrical Engineering Services for the
Dollar Hill Pump Station Standby Power Electrical System. The contract included preparing Plans
and Specifications to add a new 600 KW generator to the Dollar Hill Pump Station. This generator
was in addition to the existing generator; however both generators would derive their fuel from a
new common Diesel Fuel Day Tank.

Stantec Consulting Inc. received a proposal from and entered into a Subcontract with Dinter
Engineering Co., to perform the Electrical and Mechanical Engineering for this project. Dinter
Engineering Co. performed the required Electrical Engineering and prepared the project Technical
Specifications and Construction Plans. Stantec Consulting Inc. and North Tahoe Public Utility
District reviewed the contract specifications and plans, approving them for construction.
North Tahoe Public Utility District added the necessary General Specifications and issued bid
packages in two parts.

Part 1: Per Plans and Specifications, provide the Generator and Diesel Fuel Day Tank AKA Pryco
Day Tank directly to the North Tahoe Public Utility District. These parts would be provided by
North Tahoe Public Utility District to the selected Responsible Bidder for installation.

Part 2: Per Plans and Specifications provide the installation of the North Tahoe Public Utility
District Supplied Generator and Diesel Fuel Day Tank with all necessary additional labor and
material as specified and shown on the contract plans for a complete and functional generator
addition to the Dollar Hill Pump Station.

North Tahoe Public Utility District Awarded Part 1 to Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and
Generator Supplier and Part 2 to KFC Building Concepts, the General Contractor as the most
responsible bidders.

KFC Building Concepts awarded a subcontract for the Electrical Installation to Western Pacific
Electric Inc. the Electrical Contractor.

The final generator load testing was completed and the North Tahoe Public Utility District
employees were trained in the care and maintenance of the generator system to the satisfaction of
Stantec Consulting Inc., Dinter Engineering Co., and North Tahoe Public Utility District on June 7th,
2010.

The North Tahoe Public Utility District proceeded to maintain the Electrical and Mechanical system
from the date of the final testing through December 19, 2010, the date of the sewage spill across
the Corvin family property, into the mechanical room of their family home and into
Lake Tahoe.

Scope of Investigation:
My specific assignment was to review available documents from the files of the following
organizations:
1. North Tahoe Public Utility District
2. Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering Company.
3. Dinter Engineering Co., the Electrical Engineering Company.
4. Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and Generator Supplier.
5. KFC Building Concepts, the General Contractor.
6. Western Pacific Electric Inc. the Electrical Contractor.

I attended an onsite meeting that was arranged so all interested Experts had the opportunity to
visit the site and see the generators, day tank, electrical equipment (breakers,
transformer/subpanel, mini power center) that was previously installed, new equipment (breakers,
transformer/subpanel, mini power center) installed after the fuel system failure and
perform/witness field tests of the installed Pryco Day Tank and the electrical system.

References:
1. Exhibit A, Pryco Day Tank Schematic
2. Exhibit B, Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering Company, Electrical Plan, sheet
E1.2
3. Exhibit C, Battery Charger Load
4. Exhibit D, North Tahoe Public Utility District Employee Interviews
5. Exhibit E, Pryco Day Tank Options
6. Exhibit F, Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering Company, and Dinter Engineering
Co., the Electrical Engineering Company, Electrical Engineering Service Proposal
7. Exhibit G, Fuel System, Pryco, day tank specification, include SCADA Contacts
8. Exhibit H, Boyle Engineering the North Tahoe Public Utility District Electrical Engineer, to
be consulted regarding SCADA by Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering
Company/Dinter Engineering Co., the Electrical Engineering Company
9. Exhibit I, Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and Generator Supplier, Service Report
10. Exhibit J, Panel B Mini Power Center Cut Sheet
11. Exhibit K, “Main Sewer Pump Station Master Plan” July 2009, prepared by Stantec
Consulting Inc.

Review of Data:
The volume of documents reviewed was considerable, I estimate the volume to be over 11,500
pages, and arrived in many forms such as percentage of completion drawings, proposed
specifications, final drawings, final plans, submittals, change orders, email correspondence and
contracts. I reviewed all documents submitted to me. I looked not only for information regarding
the design and construction but for inconsistencies between the sources of information. No
inconsistencies of data between the sources of documents are noted.

Site meeting June 19th, 2012
I spent 3 hours onsite taking pictures, examining equipment and asking questions.

1. Pictures of the 3 day tank motor nameplates confirmed that motors are installed as
specified.
2. The day tank was emptied and filled manually, it was verified that there is a visual level
sensor installed for the day tank. It was witnessed to be reasonably accurate.
3. I asked Joe Steck (Steck) (North Tahoe Public Utility District employee) to show me the
onsite documentation that I expected to be onsite. According to Steck no such
documentation exists.
a. Written Standard Operating Procedure
b. Written Emergency Operating Procedure
c. Written Standby Generator Testing Procedure
4. I took Pictures of the original panel B, which was in service as of the incident date and has
since been disconnected, and the existing panel B that supplies power to the day tank.
5. I asked Steck, the operator that was on duty the day of the accident several questions
with his attorney present.
a. Q. Is the cord onsite the one that was used to try to power the day tank from the
portable generators?
A. NO
b. Q. How was the cord connected to the Day Tank Fill Pumps?
A. The circuit breaker, panel B, was opened, the wires (1circuit was all that was wired to
the day tank) removed from the 20 amp breaker, the wire was then connected to the
extension cord and then plugged into the generator.
c. Q. What happened when you plugged the temporary cord into the various portable
generators?
i. A. 1 KW portable generator: The generator stopped running and the breaker on
the portable generator tripped.
ii. A. 3.5 KW portable generator: The breaker on the generator tripped.
iii. A. 100 KW portable generator: The breaker on the generator tripped.
d. Q. Was the same cord used by the Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and
Generator Supplier mechanic to get the pumps going?
A. Yes.

6. I opened and looked at the SCADA Panel, I took pictures of the schematic, it was found
that two spare inputs are currently used for Power Failure and Day Tank Low Fuel
monitoring, no other new inputs were marked up on the schematic.
7. I reviewed the log book that was onsite, the generator run hours are written down daily.
The log forms do not provide for condition or operation notes. Steck told me that they no
longer test the generators manually, the exerciser does the testing. They know if the
generator exercised by reviewing the run time meter. Steck further said that the
generators test run about two tenths of an hour per week.
8. With both fill pumps running the measured load current is within specification for two 1/3
HP pump motors, 13.2 Amps (rated 6.6 Full Load Amperage (FLA) each motor) and the
Return pump running was 8.66 Amps (rated 9.2 FLA), which is normal for a 1/2 HP Motor.
9. When the manual switch was turned on for the fill pumps BOTH fill pumps ran at the same
time.
10. When the manual switch was turned on for the return pump, the return pump ran.
11. When the day tank was operated in the automatic mode, all functions worked as drawn in
the Pryco day tank schematic.
12. The hand pump cannot be used to fill the day tank due to a Normally Closed anti-flooding
solenoid valve installed on the inlet to the fill pumps. This valve is installed to prevent
flooding of the day tank once it has been filled and the fill pumps are turned off.

Discussion:
1. Exhibit “A” The day tank manufacturer PRYCO, provided for two 20 amp 120 volt power
circuits to the day tank; the first circuit being for the fill pumps (supply motors) and the
second circuit for the return pump (reverse motor). Had the second circuit been specified
and installed the load of three pumps would have been split between two circuits and would
not have tripped even if all three pumps were running either in the automatic, manual or a
control system malfunction mode. If a failure in the automatic controls occurs all three
pumps would run, at least three failure scenarios could cause this to happen.

2. Exhibit “B” On Sheet E1.2 of the construction documents Dinter Engineering Co., the
Electrical Engineering Company specified only one 20 amp 120-volt circuit to be installed to
power the day tank. The single 20 amp circuit from panel B can start and run the two fill
pumps (supply motors), but is insufficient to operate the two fill pumps (supply motors) and
the return pump (reverse motor) at one time without overloading a single 20 amp 120 volt
circuit.
3. Exhibit “C” Panel B’s 7.5 KVA transformer as shown by Dinter Engineering Co., on the
panel schedule on sheet E1.2, was undersized for the loads due to the following items:
battery charger full load amps (FLA) being 6 amps (720 watts), not 0.83 amp (100 watts) as
shown; the Crankcase heater; and the possibility that all three pumps could run at one time if
there was a day tank control malfunction. The correct size of Panel B’s transformer is 10
KVA, as now installed on the site.
4. Operation of the day tank by the portable generators:
a. The 3.5 KW and the 100 KW portable generators are adequate to start and run two 1/3
HP (fill pumps) and the one 1/2 HP (return pump) motors.
b. The 3.5 KW and the 100 KW portable generators would have been able to run both fill
pumps and the return pump had it been selected to manual operation.
c. Exhibit “D” It was reported in the interviews of the North Tahoe Public Utility District
employees on 12/21/2010 as transcribed by Marianne Potts on 12/22/2010 that the
Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and Generator supplier mechanic, was able to run
the fill pumps to fill the day tank with a cord connected to the 100 KW portable generator.
The Cashman Power Systems Mechanic’s Field report dated 12/20/2010 states that he
opened the breaker to the day tank, connected a “pigtail” to the controller and using an
extension cord; he connected the day tank to the large portable generator and was able to
run the fill pump.
5. Exhibit “E” If an Anti-flooding solenoid valve with a manual bypass is installed (Day tank
option366); the hand pump could be used to fill the day tank.
6. Exhibit “F” Supervisory and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Monitoring: The Stantec
Consulting Inc. proposal Exhibit “A” dated April 6, 2009, task 1 item 4 to North Tahoe Public
Utility District stated that “the report will also discuss the connection of controls and alarms
reporting to the existing SCADA or monitoring/alarm system”. The Dinter Engineering Co.
(subcontractor) proposal to Stantec Consulting Inc. on July 01, 2009 stated “We are
proposing design of electrical connections associated with the generator, radiator, louver

controls, fueling, SCADA, modifications to the electrical switchgear and a new automatic
transfer switch”. Dinter Engineering Co. attached a spread sheet to their proposal showing
that they included 11 hours in their estimate for the engineering work to investigate, design
and document the additions to the SCADA system. I did not find correspondence in the
Stantec Consulting Inc., Dinter Engineering Co., or North Tahoe Public Utility District
documents that suggest that SCADA investigation was done by contacting the North Tahoe
Public Utility District Electrical Engineer, Boyle Engineering to see if their organization
recommended additional SCADA monitoring.
7. Exhibit “G” The standard of care for pump station monitoring would include SCADA
monitoring of Low and High Fuel level in the day tank. SCADA system monitoring of
Generator operation and fuel status is imperative, since without fuel, the generators cannot
run and if the tank was over full, a fuel spill could happen. In fact the Dinter Engineering Co.
day tank specifications section 16100-8 par 2.6.1 included “SCADA monitoring contacts”.
The Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and Generator Supplier submittals included
High and Low level alarm floats (SCADA monitoring contacts), and were approved as
submitted. During the submittal review the reviewing engineer for Dinter Engineering Co.,
should have questioned how the “SCADA monitoring contacts” were to be integrated with
the SCADA system and then realized that they had not been integrated with the SCADA
system. If this additional SCADA monitoring was installed, the estimated additional cost
would have been less than $7,000.00 including hardware, installation and programming.
8. A local alarm panel would have served a similar function as SCADA monitoring.
This would have provided the North Tahoe Public Utility District an early warning that the
fuel tank was in a low fuel condition, allowing time to determine the cause of the low fuel
before it became critical during the winter storm that occurred on December 19, 2010. If this
additional local alarm panel was installed, the estimated additional cost would have been
less than $3,000.00 including hardware and installation.
9. EXHIBIT “H” I did not find correspondence from Stantec Consulting Inc. or Dinter
Engineering Co. to North Tahoe Public Utility District’s Electrical Engineer, Boyle
Engineering requesting input or direction as to additional recommended SCADA monitoring
for the Dollar Pump Station.
10. EXHIBIT “I” On the day of the sewage spill Cashman Power Systems arrived onsite,
found the 20 amp breaker to the day tank tripped, connected a pigtail to the fill pump wiring
then connected the day tank controls to the 1000 KW Portable Generator. Then he was able

to fill the day tank to supply fuel to the two standby generators, test the generators and day
tank operation.
11. Exhibit “J” Mini Power Center specifications lists the increased maximum capacity of
the replacement 10 KVA transformer over the specified 7.5 KVA transformer from 30 to 40
amps an increase of 25% in capacity.
12. Exhibit “K” Main Sewer Pump Station Master Plan, completed in July of 2009, by
Stantec Consulting Inc., recommends generator monitoring by the SCADA system, but no
mention of Fuel Tank or Day Tank level monitoring. During an emergency, without fuel, the
Standby Generators cannot run to supply power to the sewer pumps to prevent a sewer
spill!

Conclusions:
Based on the facts presented previously in this document; and to a reasonable degree of
engineering certainty; I have made the following conclusions.

The Fuel level in the day tank is paramount to the operation of the Standby Generators and utmost
care should have been taken to assure that the day tank stays full and is monitored with the
SCADA system.
  1. Dinter Engineering Co., the Electrical Engineering Company, was negligent in their design:
    a. Two 120 volt circuits should have been supplied for the day tank to eliminate the
possibility of overloading and tripping the single 20 amp breaker that was specified and
installed.
    b. The 7.5 KVA transformer/mini power center was undersized for the load, due to Dinter
Engineering Co. miscalculating the load of the battery charger (720 watts not 100
watts) the possibility of multiple pumps running under abnormal day tank operating
conditions and during inclement weather, the possible lower than normal voltage,
causing the pumps to have a higher starting and running current.

c. The 20 amp 2 pole breaker feeding the 7.5 KVA transformer/mini power center was
undersized by Dinter Engineering Co. and at a minimum should have been a 30 amp 2
pole breaker equaling or exceeding the primary breaker to the transformer/mini power
center as supplied by the manufacturer (Eaton).
d. Day tank SCADA contacts were specified
by Dinter Engineering Co. to monitor the fuel
level in the day tank; however, Dinter Engineering Co. did not specify that the contacts
be connected to the SCADA system or a local alarm panel.
e. Day tank sequence of operation
clearly describes the Low and High level floats. Dinter
Engineering Co. did not specify that the contacts be connected to the SCADA system or
a local alarm panel.
f. One or both day tank fill pumps could have been specified by Dinter Engineering Co. as
Battery operated to providing operation during a loss of commercial or backup power.
See exhibit “E” option 440/441.
g. The generator specification written by Dinter Engineering Co. required that the
generator representative train the North Tahoe Public Utility District personnel. The
specific training desired and duration of training was not specified by Dinter Engineering
Co. nor were training materials required to be left with the North Tahoe Public Utility
District personnel for reference. This lack of direction to Cashman Power Systems the
Generator Supplier, allowed them to not provide the North Tahoe Public Utility District
personnel written reference materials to be used in case of an emergency, such as the
day tank running out of fuel and/or the generators losing prime.
2. Stantec Consulting Inc., the Prime Engineering Company was negligent:
a. Stantec Consulting Inc. did not recognize that the power supply for the day tank was
inadequate and that SCADA was not integrated to monitor the fuel level in the day tank.
b. Stantec Consulting Inc. did not complete the work outlined in their April 6th 2009
proposal to North Tahoe Public Utility District under “Scope of Work Task 1-Generation
option report”, item 4, “connection of the existing SCADA system as required to the new
equipment.”

c. Stantec failed to consider SCADA improvements as part of the pump station
improvements as required under contract with the North Tahoe Public Utility District.

d. Stantec Consulting Inc. stated to North Tahoe Public Utility District that they have
worked with Dinter Engineering Co. for over 40 years; this statement by Stantec
Consulting Inc. induced the reader to believe Dinter Engineering Co. was a competent
Electrical Engineering firm. My review of the Stantec Consulting Inc. and North Tahoe
Public Utility District documents found a lack of notes or review comments regarding
Dinter Engineering Electrical Engineering specifications, by either party. The lack of
correspondence and review comments of the drawings and specifications prepared by
Dinter Engineering Co. is an indication that neither Stantec Consulting Inc. nor North
Tahoe Public Utility District performed a peer review of Dinter Engineering Co.’s work.

e. Main Sewer Pump Station Master Plan, completed in July of 2009, by Stantec
Consulting Inc., recommends generator monitoring by the SCADA system10, but no
mention of Fuel Tank or Day Tank level monitoring. Stantec Consulting Inc. failed to
recognize the importance of SCADA monitoring of the day tank fuel level. During an
emergency, without fuel, the Standby Generators cannot run to supply power to the
sewer pumps to prevent a sewer spill!

3. The North Tahoe Public Utility District was negligent.
a. Dollar pump station has over 900 HP of Pumps ranging from 1/3 HP to 350 HP. With a
high degree of engineering certainty it can be stated that, using the 100 KW portable
generator to timely start and run either the small 1/3 HP day tank fill pump or the 100 HP
lead sewage pump, would have avoided the sewage spill.
b. It is questionable if the 1 KW generator tried first would successfully start the 1/3 HP
pump. It is noted that the 3.5 KW portable generator tried second would have easily run
the 1/3 HP day tank fill pump but not the 100 HP sewage pump.
c. When the power went off, the smallest pump motor in the station, only 1/3 HP, needed
to be wired in such a way to temporarily provide power to the day tank fill pump to fill the
day tank. The North Tahoe Public Utility District employees failed to successfully
temporarily connect the day tank fill pump to the two larger portable generators (3.5 KW
and 100 KW) to run the pump to fill the empty day tank with fuel so the large

generator(s) could run the sewage pumps and prevent the sewage spill from happening.
When the Cashman Power Systems technician arrived, he was able to run the day tank
fill pump with a temporary pigtail and an extension cord to a portable generator that was
already onsite.
d. When North Tahoe Public Utility District personnel connected the temporary cord
between the 1/3 HP day tank fill pump and the portable generators and the breaker
tripped on both of the 3.5KW and the 100KW portable generators; this was an indication
that the cord or wiring was miswired, not the portable generators being of insufficient
capacity. It was necessary at that point to further analyze the temporary wiring to
ascertain what the problem was. Running either one of the two 1/3 HP fill pumps could
have filled the day tank and allowed the new generator to be primed and run, thereby
supplying power to the sewage pump(s) to pump down the wet well and avoid the
sewage spill.
e. Only after the sewage spill had already occurred were the North Tahoe Public Utility
District personnel able to start a much larger sewage pump (100HP) using a portable
cable brought from another pump station, thereby temporarily connecting the portable
100 KW generator to pump #3 to lower the sewage level in the wet well and stop the
sewage spill.
f. The unsatisfactory response to the sewage spill emergency by the North Tahoe Public
Utility District personnel was substandard. Using the SCADA system logs it was
determined that from the time the North Tahoe Public Utility District personnel entered
the station to the time sewage pumping was restarted, 3.76 hours had elapsed, the
sewage spill had already been overflowing for 2.86 hours.
g. A visual fill indicator is installed on the day tank, at any time the day tank fuel level can
be noted simply by looking at the fuel gauge; this gauge is much like a cars fuel gauge;
displaying E for Empty and F for Full. This fuel gauge works even in the absence of
SCADA monitoring or electricity. During weekly visits to the pump station; maintenance
personnel should have seen that the tank was becoming less full and been aware that
the fill pumps were not keeping the day tank filled to capacity.
h. The North Tahoe Public Utility District does not have an established program of routine
maintenance and operations testing as suggested by the National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) standard 110. NFPA standard 110 “Emergency and Standby

Power Systems” paragraph A.8.1 suggests that for “The continuing reliability and
integrity of the EPSS (Emergency Power Standby System) are dependent on an
established program of routine maintenance and operations testing”.
i. The following three Documents are not on site for operators of this pump station to
reference:
i. A written Standard Operating Procedure.
ii. A written Emergency Operating Procedure.
iii. A written Standby Generator Testing Procedure.

4. The Western Pacific Electric Inc. the Electrical Contractor was negligent:
When connecting the day tank the Western Pacific Electric Inc. electrician read the day
tank schematic to determine where to connect the power to the control panel. Reading
the schematic was necessary since the Dinter Engineering Co., Electrical Engineer did
not specifically show on the construction drawing where to connect the 120 volt power to
the day tank. The schematic clearly indicates terminals 1&2 are to be used “To 120 VAC
power supply for controls and supply motors” (Fill pumps); terminals 3&4 are to be used
“To 120 VAC power supply for reverse motor” (Return Pump). The foregoing statement
clearly indicates that two 120 volt circuits are required when supplying power to the
Pryco day tank. The Western Pacific Electric Inc. electrician should have questioned
there being only one circuit supplied to the day tank controls and the three motors. If the
Western Pacific Electric Inc. electrician had questioned, through a Request for
Information (RFI), “if two circuits were required to the day tank as shown on the day tank
schematic?” Dinter Engineering Co. would have had the opportunity to reconsider the
need for one or two 120 volt circuits run to the day tank. With the answer in hand; the
Western Pacific Electric Inc. electrician would have wired the day tank as further
considered and clarified by Dinter Engineering Co.

5. Cashman Power Systems, the Day Tank and Generator Supplier was negligent:
Training of the North Tahoe Public Utility District personnel was required by the
generator specifications, page 16100-10 paragraph 3.4.1. “Provide on-site training to
instruct the owner’s personnel in the proper operation and maintenance of the
equipment. Review operation and maintenance manuals, parts manuals, and
emergency service procedures.” I have asked for a written training manual or training
checklist to be provided for my review. I have been told that no written training manual
or written emergency checklist was provided by Cashman Power Systems to North

Tahoe Public Utility District personnel. It is below the Standard of Care to train plant
mechanics on such a complex subject as 600 KW Generator Maintenance and expect
that the mechanics being trained will remember the information covered without issuing
a written training manual or written emergency checklist to be used by the North Tahoe
Public Utility District for reference.

6. KFC Building Concepts, the General Contractor was negligent:
KFC Building Concepts hired as a subcontractor Western Pacific Electric Inc. the
Electrical Contractor to wire the new generator and the associated equipment including
the day tank. The Prime contractor is responsible for its subcontractor’s performance.

Joseph Perry Electrical Expert Witness Electrician Contractor EngineerCurriculum Vitae                  June 18, 2013

 

JOSEPH PERRY P.E. JPPE
P.O. Box 141
Penngrove, CA 94951
Mobile: 707‐477‐3862
Email: perryj4@JosephPerryPE.com
Website:http://www.JosephPerryPE.com
Personal Statement

33 years’ experience as a Professional Electrical Engineer and Licensed Electrical Contractor
provides an extensive background in Electrical Power and Controls Engineering. I am seeking Expert
Witness Work relating to losses or damages associated with the Water and Wastewater industry,
Industrial Electrical Controls/Processes. I have many years of construction experience in Municipal
Construction Projects and Interpreting Municipal Plans and Specifications and can provide
testimony as to the Standard of Care Provided by Electrical Engineers and Contractors.
Licenses
Professional Electrical Engineer
Licensed Contractor, Electrical, Plumbing,
HVAC

Skills
-SCADA and Telemetering Control & Design
Variable Frequency Motor Control &
Design
-Reduced Voltage Soft Start Control &
Design
-Flow and Blow‐off Control & Design
-Motor Control Center (MCC) Applications

CA# 9683E & HI# E12924
CA# 402494
Estimating, Project Management
Well, Storage Tank, Pumping Control & Design
Cellular and Radio Communications
Critical Load and Standby Generator Applications
Facility Automation, Programmable Logic Control
Energy Monitoring and Control Applications
Standard of Care, Forensic Analysis
Educational Foundation
Healds Engineering College, San Francisco
BS Electrical Engineering (Power and Control Systems Focus) BSEE May 1974

Current Employment
Independent Consulting Electrical Engineer Control Systems West, Inc.
June 2002 – Current.
My primary design duties are to design Power and Controls for Water and Wastewater Pump
Stations and medium size Wastewater Treatment Plant Control Panels. I am the responsible
Electrical Engineer for all Control Systems West, Inc. CA and HI projects that require an Electrical
Engineer’s design approval and engineering stamp. I am the Contract Administrator for most of the
Control Systems West, Inc. contracts to provide control panels, which are used by municipalities in
California and Hawaii. I am the Primary contact for Underwriters Laboratory (UL) certification of
Industrial Control Panels (UL508A and UL698) that are designed and built at Control Systems West,
Inc.
Reference Contact
Bruce Borders, President
Phone: 707‐763‐1108 x3011 Email: bruce.borders@controlwest.com

Work History
Owner California Energy Experts
June 2001 – June 2002
I was an Independent Engineering Consultant and Electrical Contractor for the City of Cotati
Department of Public Works Water and Wastewater Pump Stations. Also I worked for various
clients performing Electrical Contracting Services. Working with Control Systems West, Inc., with its
established volume of business, offered a superb opportunity to utilize my Engineering Design
talents in the Design of Industrial Control Panels dedicated to the Water and Waste Water Industry.

Investment Broker Edward Jones Investments
June 1998 – June 2001
After Passing the Securities and Exchange Commission Series 7 License, I opened an Edward Jones
Investment office in Rohnert Park, CA. I serviced my clients by selling Stocks, Mutual Funds, Bonds,
Annuities, Life and Long Term Care Insurance. I enjoyed helping my clients establish a safe and
secure financial future. I enjoyed the sales aspect of the business however this business was much
too distant from the finite business of Engineering that I love.

Outside Sales Cal Air, Inc.
April 1997 – May 1998
Outside Sales of Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Services, Cal Air purchased my
previous Electrical Engineering; Electrical, HVAC, Plumbing Contracting business, I agreed to stay on
in the sales capacity for one year to expand their presence in the Sonoma County area and provide
continuity with our existing client base. Cal Air was a business consolidator, purchasing contractor
shops in the Energy Management and HVAC industry.

President California Energy Experts, Inc., (CEE)
Nov 1984 – April 1997
We designed and built Facility Automation Systems totaling 7.6 million square feet of municipal,
school, commercial and light industrial building spaces in 15 states. Project makeup was
approximately 36% new & 64% retrofit installations. We Incorporated, programmed, and supported
dedicated technically advanced controllers for HVAC Systems. Our Lighting Control Systems
incorporated Day‐lighting and Time of Day Scheduling. Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) (AFD), were
used on cooling towers, pumps, supply and return fans to enhance the energy efficiency of HVAC
systems. Economizer Damper positioning and monitoring were an integral part of our control
designs which led to further energy reductions. Demand Control routines were incorporated in the
designs when advantages to the customer. All systems included remote communication abilities to
allow offsite monitoring and minor software revisions. We expanded our company’s expertise by
bidding and installing Well, Water, Wastewater, Flood Control, Power and Control Systems.
Designed and built Standby Generator Systems (up to 250KW) including single and multiple transfer
switches and isolation of critical/non‐critical loads, we incorporated Peak Shaving strategies into
the design when applicable. California Energy Experts was expanded by incorporating HVAC and
Plumbing contracting under our umbrella. California Energy Experts was sold to Cal Air, Inc. which
provided me an opportunity to explore Outside Sales without the stress of running the day‐to‐day
business of the Engineering / Contracting business.

Owner Energy Experts
May 1982 – Nov 1984
When Energy Experts was formed my goal was to design and install Control Systems dedicated to
Energy Management in Commercial Buildings; utilizing the most recent computerized
advancements in HVAC and Lighting Controls. I began by selling the concept to businessmen in our
county, then designing and installing the control system. After landing Energy Management System
Design and Installation contracts with a major Department Store chain, Energy Experts quickly grew
and earned the respect of the Facilities Managers for this chain. As the company volume grew
Energy Experts was incorporated and renamed to California Energy Experts, Inc.

Electrical Engineer P.E. RE Corp. Inc., DBA Reliance Enterprises
April 1979 ‐ April 1982
After obtaining Professional Engineer Status I was immediately moved to the office environment. I
soon began estimating Electrical Construction Projects and assisted in Contract Administration and
Purchasing materials that were required to complete the successfully bid projects. Our firm was the
Electrical Engineers for several Waste Water Treatment projects and I was responsible for
specifying the Electrical Devices that were to be used and minor design modifications. As time
progressed I began to design Water and Waste Water controls for many Pump Stations and Wells. I
also earned my Electrical Contractors License during this period. The Engineering & Contracting

foundation established at RE Corp afforded me the knowledge, experience and confidence to start
my own Engineering / Contracting business Energy Experts specializing in Control Systems.

Engineering Trainee EIT RE Corp. Inc., DBA Reliance Enterprises
June 1974 – April 1979
My first position at RE Corp placed me in the field for 5 years, this hands-on experience consisted of
troubleshooting and repairing HVAC Equipment and Control Systems, Fire Alarm Systems,
Communication and Electronic Clock Systems at schools and commercial customers. I was also
trained on the repair of Boiler Controls primarily for the commercial and Industrial business sector.
This practical field experience was a stepping stone to a better understanding of Applied
Engineering designed by others and allowed me the opportunity to learn to be a Practical Design
Engineer not just a Theoretical Engineer.

References
Dave Thomas P.E. Peer / Electrical Engineer specializing in the Water/ Waste Water Industry
Phone: 707‐769‐1410
Email: dthomas@dmtassociates.net
Bruce Borders Owner / Control Systems West Inc.
Phone: 707‐7631108 x 1011
Email: bruce.borders@controlwest.com
Dan Blanquie Insurance Loss Mitigation Trainer / Friend
Phone: 707‐338‐4003
Email: danb@dbclaims.com

Membership in Trade Associations
Institute of Electrical Electronic Engineers, (IEEE), my IEEE # 90393171
Senior Member Status
Forensic Expert Witness Association, (FEWA), San Francisco Chapter
Board of Directors, Membership Chair

Contact Me

LinkedIn

3141 Stevens Creek Blvd; Suite 40259 San Jose , CA 95117

707-477-3862